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Photo & Video Chronology


USGS-HVO photos and videos are in the public domain and can be freely downloaded from the HVO website (click on a photo to open a full resolution copy). Please credit "U.S. Geological Survey" for any imagery used.

September 20, 2019
Video of circulation in the Halema‘uma‘u water pond

VIDEO: This time-lapse video shows circulation in the water pond in Halema‘uma‘u over a period of about 25 minutes. There appears to be an influx of water along the southern (right) shoreline. A broader eastward flow of water (toward top of image) is evident. The video is shown twice. USGS video.
September 17, 2019
Stable temperatures at Halema‘uma‘u water pond

The thermal camera today showed surface temperatures on the water pond in Halema‘uma‘u of approximately 70 degrees Celsius (158 degrees Fahrenheit), similar to previous observations. The water level continues to slowly rise, but there were no significant changes observed during today's visit. USGS images by M. Patrick, 09-17-2019.

VIDEO: Shown at 30x speed, this video highlights changing activity on the surface of the water pond. Steam wafting above the pond shifts in the wind, and circulation of the water is evident in areas of sharp color boundaries. USGS video by M. Patrick, 09-17-2019.
September 14, 2019
Halema‘uma‘u water pond on September 14

No major changes were observed at the water pond in Halema‘uma‘u today (Sept. 14). The water level continues to slowly rise, gradually enlarging the pond surface area. USGS photo by M. Patrick, 09-14-2019.

Images taken on September 10 and 14 show the slight rise in water level, most obvious by comparing the rock marked with an arrow in each photo. USGS photos by M. Patrick.
September 10, 2019
Halema‘uma‘u water pond on September 10

No major changes were observed at the water pond in Halema‘uma‘u during this morning's visit. The water surface continues to slowly rise, as shown by comparing the waterline against rocks in today's and yesterday's photos. USGS photo by M. Patrick, 09-10-2019.

Left: This photo was taken just a few minutes after the image above. With a slight shift in the direction steam wafted above the water and a different camera setting, variations in the color of the water surface became more obvious. USGS photo by M. Patrick, 09-10-2019. Right: This telephoto image shows the color variation in the eastern portion of the pond, with a sharp boundary between yellow and greenish-blue areas in the water. USGS photo by M. Patrick, 09-10-2019.
September 9, 2019
Halema‘uma‘u water pond—animated image file

This animated image file (GIF) shows how the water pond at the bottom of Halema‘uma‘u rose between August 6 and September 8, 2019. A sequence of one webcam image per day ends with a black screen and then repeats. These images are from HVO's K3 webcam (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/webcam.html?webcam=K3cam), which peers into Halema‘uma‘u from the west rim of the crater. USGS webcam images.
Continued slow rise of water level at bottom of Halema‘uma‘u

Photos taken on Friday, September 6, and today (Monday), September 9, show that the water level in the pond continues to slowly rise. For example, the rock marked by the arrow is a good indicator of the change in water level over the weekend. USGS photos by M. Patrick.

VIDEO: Views of the water pond in Halema‘uma‘u on Friday, September 6, and Monday, September 9 are shown in this video. Ripples are evident on the pond, presumably due to wind moving over the water surface. No significant changes in the pond were observed over the weekend, and the water level continues to slowly rise. USGS video by M. Patrick.
September 5, 2019
Halema‘uma‘u water pond

Day-to-day changes in the water level at the bottom of Halema‘uma‘u are subtle and impossible to accurately measure. But when comparing views of the pond over several days some differences can be seen, as shown in these images. Rocks that were visible in the water on September 2 could no longer be seen today (September 5). Note particularly that two rocks protruding above the water at the top of the September 2 photo are now submerged—evidence that the pond continues to slowly rise. USGS photos by D. Swanson.
September 2, 2019

HVO geologists have been making daily treks to the summit of Kīlauea to observe and measure the water pond at the bottom of Halema‘uma‘u. USGS photo by K. Mulliken, 08-30-2019.
Halema‘uma‘u water pond on September 2

During today's observations of the water in Halema‘uma‘u, steam around the pond precluded definitive diameter measurements, but the pond level appeared higher than yesterday (note the increased submergence of rocks on the left side of the pond between September 1 and 2). Based on attempted measurements today, as well as measurements the past two days, estimated pond diameters are now around 90 m (295 ft) east-west and 44-45 m (144-148 ft) north-south. USGS photos by D. Swanson.
September 1, 2019
Continued slow rise of water level at bottom of Halema‘uma‘u

VIDEO: This sequence captured on August 31 begins with a close-up of the fumaroles on the north side of Halema‘uma‘u, then shows a broader view of the crater with the water pond at the bottom and a close-up of steaming and ripples on the water surface. USGS video by M. Patrick, 08-31-2019.
August 31, 2019
More photographs of the lower East Rift Zone flow field from Thursday overflight

Left: This aerial view looks south and shows the Cape Kumukahi lighthouse and Kapoho area. The 2018 lava flow is the dark region in the top half of the photo. Kapoho Crater is in the upper right corner. USGS photo by D. Becker, 08-29-2019 Right: A close-up of the scalloped shoreline of the 2018 lava in the Kapoho Bay area. USGS photo by D. Becker, 08-29-2019.

Left: A wider view of the Kapoho area showing Highway 132 road construction (middle), Four Corners area (middle left), a quarry in red oxidized cinder of the 1960 eruption cone (lower left), and Kapoho Crater, a prehistoric vent now covered by vegetation (center). The original village of Kapoho, destroyed by the 1960 eruption, was in the area between the 1960 cone and Kapoho Crater. Fuming at the top of the photo is from the wide area of 2018 lava that buried the Kapoho Farm Lots subdivision. Kapoho Beach Lots and Vacationland Hawai‘i subdivisions, also buried by 2018 lava, were closer to the shoreline at the top of the image. USGS photo by D. Becker, 08-29-2019. Right: A closer view of Kapoho Crater. Green Lake was previously near the center of the crater, but was filled in by 2018 lava. Highway 132 road construction can be seen near the top of the photo. USGS photo by D. Becker, 08-29-2019.

A view of the coastline near Pohoiki, showing the May 2018 lava flows, which were the first flows of the 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption to reach the ocean. Highway 137 has been re-cut through these flows to provide access to Pohoiki (bottom center). USGS photo by D. Becker, 08-29-2019.

Left: View looking north of Leilani Estates subdivision, with the fissure 8 vent near the center of the photo. The main fissure 8 flow extended north of the vent, towards the upper right corner of the photo. USGS photo by D. Becker, 08-29-2019. Right: View looking north, showing a close-up of the fissure 8 cone. USGS photo by D. Becker, 08-29-2019.

Left: View looking east, showing the narrow lava channels from fissures 6, 13, 20 and 22. These channels carried lava south to the ocean in May 2018. USGS photo by D. Becker, 08-29-2019. Right: View looking northeast, showing the line of steaming areas west of the Leilani Estates subdivision, around Ala‘ili Road. No lava reached the surface in this area, but magma presumably rose to a shallow level here during the 2018 eruption. USGS photo by D. Becker, 08-29-2019.

Left: View looking east showing the large perched lava channel on the fissure 8 flow. USGS photo by D. Becker, 08-29-2019. Right: A close-up of the perched lava channel on the fissure 8 flow in Leilani Estates. The drained channel floor (bottom left) was covered by the very last stages of sluggish lava erupted from fissure 8. The channel levee (upper right) was built from numerous fluid pāhoehoe overflows. USGS photo by D. Becker, 08-29-2019.
More photographs of Kīlauea summit from Thursday overflight

Left: A near-vertical view into Halema‘uma‘u, with the water pond at the bottom still in the shadow of early morning light. USGS photo by D. Becker, 08-29-2019. Right: A closer view of the water pond at the bottom of Halema‘uma‘u, looking north. USGS photo by D. Becker, 08-29-2019.

View looking east across the eastern part of Kīlauea caldera. The lower portion of the caldera floor (right) dropped during the 2018 collapse events. Prior to 2018, this down-dropped portion had been level with the caldera floor visible at left. Kīlauea Iki can be seen in the background (upper left). USGS photo by D. Becker, 08-29-2019.

View looking north, showing the new fault scarp that developed during the 2018 caldera-floor collapse events. The scarp is about 150 m (500 feet) high. Mauna Kea is visible in the far distance. USGS photo by D. Becker, 08-29-2019.
August 30, 2019
Kīlauea summit

Left: Clear weather provided good views of the water pond in Halema‘uma‘u, which continues to slowly rise. The variation in color on the surface was evident today. USGS photo by M. Patrick, 08-30-2019. Right: This close-up of the eastern end of the pond provides a better view of the varying surface color. Ripples are also obvious. USGS photo by M. Patrick, 08-30-2019.

Numerous fumaroles are present below the north rim of Halema‘uma‘u. This telephoto image shows the extensive sulfur deposits on the rocks surrounding the gas vents, which are visible as small black holes, such as the prominent one near the top of the image. USGS photo by M. Patrick, 08-30-2019.